Identifying Peer Institutions to Benchmark and Inspire Your Nonprofit Goals

Identifying Peer Institutions to Benchmark and Inspire Your Nonprofit Goals

You’ve sat in that meeting:  the one where a member of the board says “if the drug prevention coalition across town can raise $175,000 at their gala, why can’t we?” Unknowingly, what your board member is offering is a benchmark comparison, measuring a peer institution’s performance against yours. Depending on what you want to learn from another organization, different peer institutions might be helpful comparisons.

What Do the Bloomberg and Steyer Campaigns Teach Us About Nonprofit Fundraising and Marketing?

What Do the Bloomberg and Steyer Campaigns Teach Us About Nonprofit Fundraising and Marketing?

Tom Steyer and Mike Bloomberg had millions of dollars at their disposal. Yet, their marketing dollars didn’t translate into voluntary support. What does that mean for nonprofit organizations that don’t have the wallets these men have but do, similarly, need to mobilize voluntary support?

How Are You Speaking Your Donor’s ‘Love Language’ At Your Special Events?

How Are You Speaking Your Donor’s ‘Love Language’ At Your Special Events?

We all want to deepen our relationships with our donors, to cultivate and steward them so that they fall in love with the causes we serve. Taking a page from psychologist and best-selling author Gary Chapman, we need to speak our donor’s “love language.” How are you speaking your donor’s love language at your events? One hospice did a great job this past weekend. This is how they spoke all 5 donor love languages.

Advice for United Methodists (and Others) About Capital Campaigns:  Fundraising in a Time of Church Division

Advice for United Methodists (and Others) About Capital Campaigns: Fundraising in a Time of Church Division

The most compelling reasons that campaigns either succeed or fail are not external, but internal to the fundraising organizations themselves:  does the organization have a compelling case for the campaign, does the organization have strong staff and volunteer leadership, does the organization have a history of achieving fundraising success (and, therefore, has committed, loyal donors). Further, is the organization prepared to bear the costs of launching a campaign. Of course, for United Methodist organizations and affiliated organizations, the issue of whether or not the UMC splits is arguably an internal, not external, condition.

Wherever United Methodist organizations are located, they need to ask: Do we have committed, loyal donors who will give to us no matter what happens with the UMC structure? If the answer is yes, great. If not, we might need to pause.