50 Acts of Virtual Volunteering

50 Acts of Virtual Volunteering

We tend to think of volunteers as the community do-gooders who visit our offices and do manual labor like painting office walls, gardening, sorting inkind donations in clothes closets, or stacking canned goods in food pantries. Those acts of volunteer service are critical—for some of us—even essential, but there are many things that volunteers can do even if they don’t want to (or can’t) come into our offices. Here is a list of 50 things that virtual volunteers can do—

What Do the Bloomberg and Steyer Campaigns Teach Us About Nonprofit Fundraising and Marketing?

What Do the Bloomberg and Steyer Campaigns Teach Us About Nonprofit Fundraising and Marketing?

Tom Steyer and Mike Bloomberg had millions of dollars at their disposal. Yet, their marketing dollars didn’t translate into voluntary support. What does that mean for nonprofit organizations that don’t have the wallets these men have but do, similarly, need to mobilize voluntary support?

Teaching Your Children About Philanthropy

Teaching Your Children About Philanthropy

The next few weeks are essential to nonprofits. 25% of all donations for the year come in between November 14 and December 14.

There is an out-pouring of gifts this time of year because people feel generous this time of year.

Many families decide that this is a great time to make sure that they teach their children about charitable giving and volunteerism. Some parents feel it’s especially important at this time of year to help children understand gratitude and the real meaning of the holidays. Still others are motivated by a desire to counter-balance the season’s commercialism and the focus on materialistic presents and desires for nonessential items.

Calling Up the Reserves – #AFPFC Wrap-Up

Calling Up the Reserves – #AFPFC Wrap-Up

Many organizations have some sort of Advisory Councils.  But often these councils, populated largely with former board members or community dignitaries that don’t have time to be board members, languish, largely neglected by the very organizations that have created them. They often have no clear purpose and meet infrequently.

But that doesn’t have to be the case.